Tag: teaching

Education in America is a Freaking Joke (poem)

Education in America is a freaking joke
I need you to sit down and take note
As a teacher I can explain to you firsthand
The foolishness on which I must expand
About the career I’ve chosen
About what’s got me groanin’
Questioning the choices I’ve made
That’s brought me to this day
Where I have to explain
The craziness in which I am daily forced to partake

And I say again,
education in America is a freaking joke
I don’t mean to rain on or take away your hope
I just wanted to give you some insight
To explain to you this plight
About a system that no longer works
About a system plagued with anger, frustration, and hurt

In order to so-called “compete” with other nations
We’ve sacrificed the very essence of education
Because it’s all a sick, twisted game
Where teachers are always the ones left to blame
Teachers are rated on test scores
So now their lesson content has become a bore
Testing is seen as the only way to understand
The brilliance inside of a boy or girl’s head
The kids don’t respond because they know it’s no longer about them
The system’s not set up for them to win                                                                                                                                                     It serves to just further divide
A nation that seems set to commit suicide
No child left behind
Has left most of them struggling to find
A place where they belong, to fit in
A place where they, too, can feel like they can win

And what about the parents
Why isn’t this problem apparent
That their lack of participation
Only adds to the devastation
Why do they get to sit back with fingers pointed
And not realize how much they contribute to this disjointed
And broken system that makes no sense
How long will this insanity persist?

Come on America
When will we get it right?
When we will we stand up and fight?
We need to make the classroom a place
Where children have the chance to be great
To see what makes them special and unique
Without constant fear of a harsh and judgmental critique
Let’s teach them the lessons and values that they really need
Now just how to pick between answer choices A ,B ,C, and D
Help them to discover the talents they possess
Show them how to turn that into success
Help them to compete with themselves
Not just constantly compare them to someone else
Give the teachers creative freedom
And trust that they have enough wisdom
To guide their students to the next level
Without the stupid tools you use to measure
How “effective” they are when do what they do
And by the way,
Why don’t you let them do what you hired them to do? (more…)

What Teachers Really Do During the Summer

I have people who are upset with me right now, giving me the side-eye whenever they see me. What is it that I have done to make people so upset with me? It’s all because I am a teacher and I am off for the summer and I keep posting pictures of my legs crossed, a book in my hand, and a cup of coffee at my side. No worries. No schedules. No concerns.

I’m sorry, but I am not sorry. I’m sorry that not everyone can have a job where they get two months off and, thanks to year-round pay, still get paid for it. However, I am not sorry because this is a well-deserved break. I won’t go into all of the details of what a teacher has to do during the year. However, I wanted to give some insight into what most teachers actually do during the summer.

*Disclaimer: Please excuse my grammar in this post. It’s not a dissertation, just some fun, so please don’t judge me.*

Here’s a list in no particular order:

#1 – One thing that I know I do plenty of during the summer is reflect on the previous school year. What did I do right? What did I do wrong? What can I do better?  How did I actually survive that one class period that made me want to quit every single day? Will THAT child be in my class again next year? Why did I become a teacher? Is there time for me to get another degree over the summer? Do I really have to do this again next year? Then something clicks in my brain. Wait…I have two months off.  Two full months. Two months. Then I come back to my senses and I say, “I think I’ll stick with this teaching thing after all.” Got to take the good with the bad.

#2 -Believe it or not, we actually start planning for the next school year. Wait, did you really believe all of that teacher magic could really happen with us coming back only ONE week before the students do? Noooooo!!!! Most teachers have already started filling their Pinterest boards with classroom decor and ideas for the new year. Some are attending summer trainings in order to learn new strategies (oh, and for a much needed stipend). And all are praying that this year will be the year of perfect lessons, no unnecessary meetings, and perfectly behaved students. Hey, we can dream. To tell you the truth, we know that the first week back to work for teachers is actually filled with meetings, meetings, and more meetings, so there is NO real time to plan in our rooms.

(more…)

The Entitled Generation

*Disclaimer: This is a bit of a rant.

I apologize in advance.

I had to get this off my chest.

As a child, I remember hearing the phrase, “You don’t get something for nothing,” and I realized that in order to get something, I needed to earn it. Whether this was referring to earning grades, awards, or money, it was the same idea. You get from life what you put into it. I understood the concept that hard work would be rewarded and no one wins at everything. Hard work, dedication, and perseverance were  keys to success.

The same concept seems to be neither taught nor understood by this current generation of children, the generation that includes my own children as well as the students I teach. I think this school year has been my most frustrating one out of the sixteen that I have been teaching. I don’t think I have ever had so many students angry with me because they did not receive an ‘A’ in my class for just being present in the room on a regular basis. The amount or quality of the “work” that they turned in or whether or not they actually turned in any work at all seemed to be of no consequence. They felt they should get a passing grade just because they came to class, just because they were nice, just because they got an ‘A’ on that one assignment that one time, etc.

It is extremely frustrating!

When did we start teaching kids that just because they are alive, the universe and all of the people in it owe them something? When did we start teaching kids that everyone is equal in talent and ability at everything? When did we start teaching kids that having a talent meant that they didn’t have to work hard because that talent would just carry them along to success?

I see it every day. Students who earn high test scores on standardized tests automatically seem to believe that their test scores entitle them to an ‘A’ in a class, that the mediocre work that they turn in to the teacher is acceptable and they don’t need to do any more than that. I see talented singers and dancers at the school who think that they don’t need to actually rehearse for a performance, that they can just get on stage and magic will happen. It’s in the struggling learner who feels that because everyone knows that it’s harder for them to learn, that they shouldn’t really have to work at all, that the teacher should just have sympathy as well as low expectations and gift them with a passing grade. (more…)